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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I couldn't find a thread on this, but if there is, please direct me to it.


So yesterday I went ahead and ordered a cheap/entry level record/vinyl player from Amazon (this one & the review), and I'm really a fish out of water when it comes to vinyl.

What do I need to know?
Will my AVR suffice?
WTF is a "phono preamp?" And do I need one?
How often do I change the stylus/needle?
How careful do I need to be with the actual records/vinyl?

I know there are bound to be some vinyl nerds on our forum.

TYIA
 

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Record players used to need to be plugged into a special jack on your stereo that would run the turntable signal through a preamp to get the signal up to the same line level as other components.

Most receivers no longer have that, so newer turntables usually have the preamp included and make it switchable so you can engage it or disengage it depending on what receiver you have.

So, this should work with whatever receiver you have as long as you have an open jack for it.
 

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^^^
THIS

A turntable produces a PHONO output signal. This phono signal needs to be converted to a LINE LEVEL signal (sometimes referred to as AUX signal) to work with audio equipment including stereo systems, computers, and speakers. A phono preamp converts PHONO to LINE LEVEL.

Some turntables have a preamp built-in.
Some older amplifiers and stereo systems also have preamps built-in (look for inputs marked PHONO).
If your turntable has a USB output, it has a built-in preamp.
Preamps have a wide range when it comes to build and sound quality. The cheapest preamp costs less than $50, the most expensive will cost over $500.
 

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If I am recalling correctly, I think VTPoker is an expert when it comes to vinyl. You might PM him since he may not peruse this part of the forum regularly.
 

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I have no input....other than this was my first album, got it in my Easter basket.



T
 

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Does the turntable come with its own stylus? If not, you'll have to get one yourself. Determine the correct tracking of the stylus; should be about 1 gram or less. If you set it more than that, you'll wear out your records a lot sooner.

Handle the records by the edges, so you don't get any oil/dirt on the record tracks. There still might be solutions available to wipe the records with before playing. Try not to scratch the records; store them out of sunlight.

Set your volume control to '11'.
 

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Should a kept all my old stereo gear. Shit, didn't see records coming back. And found out years later my mom threw out hundreds of records I got during the 70s while I was overseas. She's ocd about getting rid of "junk".
 

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I still have my Dual 1229Q turntable hooked up to my stereo. It still works, but the belts don't work as well as they did 40 years ago. I did find a place in the US that will repair it.

Once in a while, I like to hear music by the same artist, when there was some reason to list the songs in a particular order on an album, which might have had a concept to it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Once in a while, I like to hear music by the same artist, when there was some reason to list the songs in a particular order on an album, which might have had a concept to it.
Quite the concept, huh? :(

Okay - thanks, guys. I've done more research and yes, it does come with it's own stylus, and built-in amp.

I should get it today via UPS.

"Now I have to buy The White Album again." (this will more than likely be my first purchase)
 

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Unless you are a geeking out audiophile, the gear you got will be just fine for enjoying yourself listening to vinyl.

Some basics:
- Records are records, 180 or 200 gram records are nice because they are heavier duty and nice to handle. Handle by the edges, but seriously, fingerprints aren't going to destroy the record, so don't freak out. There are plenty of cheap cleaning kits to keep vinyl clean, there are even ultrasonic cleaners if you want to get crazy.

- I recommend looking for reissues of classic albums - just because liner notes are just a wonderful way to connect with the music and get a complete feel for a record from music to art direction. Also some reissues will include a vinyl disc of rarities or alternate takes.

- Every once in awhile check your stylus for hairs or shit caught on it. Most built in styluses are solid and will last a long time. If you have a replaceable cartridge, look for a cartridge that is either an all around listening one, or a flat response. This way signal will come in without coloring.

If you have a specific style of music you like to listen to, there are different styluses that are made for specific styles of music. Check them out if you want.

- Just enjoy the music...it's music, that is what it is made for. Don't get caught up with audiophiles who obsess about, "You don't have the right equipment to listen." You got two ears, you are all set for equipment. Enjoy records and gatefold albums. I still miss my collection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I'm *kinda* a geeky audiophile, but I don't have money to throw around, so I buy equipment I can somewhat afford, and have bought used too.

I listened to Sgt Peppers, Rumours, DSOTM, Abbey Road, and some Elton John over the long weekend, and there really is a difference. There's much more of a audio spectrum (is that a thing?), or range. I swear there was at least one part on every album I listened to that I had never heard before, and I've listened to those albums dozens and dozens of time on CD and FLAC.

It really was quite eye opening. The worst part is flipping the damn album over after only like 4 or 5 songs, but I'll get used to it.
 

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I will be honest, from a technical standpoint, digital trumps vinyl. Vinyl can't reproduce low ends as well as digital. Needles and vinyl limit the ability to put real thick bass into the groove. Too much bass, needles will skip. An over powering vocalist will a lot of "s" in their voice will sound like shit on vinyl as well.

Also, how the album is mixed for it's medium will have a huge effect on what you hear. Compression got over done for a long time in reissues and initial recordings. That has changed over the past couple of years. Another problem is vinyl runs into problems with songs further in the cut. Songs on the inner grooves don't get as much space and the sound isn't spaced out like in the outer cuts. This changes how it sounds.

Also, whatever amp you are using, preamp, etc. will "color" what you are hearing.

Borrow a couple of the same records from friends, try to get a mix of issue dates, you will get a lot of variation of sound quality...not on CD or SACD or DVD-Audio.

I still love vinyl, it's sitting down with a big book, a complete package of art and sound onto itself. I still enjoy it's sound and I do like watching the label go round and round.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·


;) ;) ;)

It must be subjective. I don't know enough on how sound/music is produced and moved to anyone media, but I can without a doubt say that what I've heard on these vinyl LP's sound far better than any CD/FLAC versions I've heard, but again, I wasn't listening to Drake.

And without question, I too have heard much deeper bass via digital. My neighbor can attest to that on most Blurays I watch. :D
 

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Well, I hope you ain't comparing listening to an LP over a stereo to listening to FLAC through your computer speakers! ;)

The sound quality of digital media is going to depend greatly on the quality of the audio that was burned to the media (how it was mastered, etc.) and the quality of the D/A converters being used.

Just like you have Blurays being released for older movies which are simply the DVD on a Bluray (with no additional quality), you'll have CDs (or other digital media) which were not in any way remastered for the media. There are CDs out there produced directly from the LP master in some cases.
 
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