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- How to behave in a Casino -
Card games


The First Time

Many people are intimidated on their first visit to a public card-room. Knowing what to expect and some simple rules of etiquette will help the first-time visitor relax and have a good time.
Any card-room with more than a few tables will have a sign-up desk or board for the various games being played.

Usually someone will be standing here to take your name if a seat is not immediately available. This person can explain what games are offered, the betting limits, special house rules and so on. This is the moment of your first decision: which game and for what stakes?




Choosing a Game

Choosing a game is fairly easy; you already know which game is most familiar to you. You may be surprised to find that your favorite home games are not spread in public card-rooms. Most will offer one or more of Texas Hold'em, Seven-Card Stud, and Omaha Hold'em (usually hi/lo split, 8-or-better for low). Sometimes you will find California Lowball (5-card draw for low), Seven-Card Stud hi/lo, or Hold'em variations like Pineapple. You will rarely find High Draw (5-card draw for hi), and will never find home game pot-builders like Anaconda, Follow-the-Queen, 7-27 or Guts. Except for the joker in draw poker, card-rooms never use wild cards.




Betting Limit

Choosing a betting limit is a bit harder. It is best to start playing at a limit so small that the money is not important to you. After all, with all the excitement of your first time playing poker there is no need to be worried about losing the nest egg to a table full of sharks.

Betting limits are typically expressed as $1-$5 or $3-$6, and may be "spread-limit" or "structured-limit".
A spread-limit means one can bet or raise any amount between the two numbers (although a raise must be at least as much as a previous bet or raise).

For example, in $1-$5 spread-limit, if one person bets $2 the next person is free to call the $2 or raise $2, $3, $4, or $5, but cannot raise just $1.

On the next round, everything is reset and the first bettor may bet anything from $1 to $5. In structured-limit like $3-$6 (usually recognizable by a factor of two between betting limits), all betting and raising on early rounds is in units of $3, and on later rounds is in units of $6.

One only has a choice of *whether* to bet or raise; the amount is fixed by the limit. One usually doesn't have a choice between spread and structured betting at a given limit.

Keep in mind that it is quite easy to win or lose 20 "big bets" (the large number in the limit) in an hour of play. Also, since your mind will be occupied with the mechanics of the game while the regular players consider strategy, you are more likely to lose than win. In other words: choose a low limit.




Buy In

Now is the time for you to take out your money and for the other players to look you over. A good choice for this "buy-in" is ten to twenty big bets, but you must buy-in for at least the posted table minimum, usually about five big bets.

Most public poker games are played "table-stakes", which means that you can't reach into your pocket for more money during the play of a hand. It also means that you can't be forced out of a pot because of insufficient funds.

If you run out of money during a hand you are still in the pot (the dealer will say you are "all-in"), but further betting is "on the side" for an additional pot you cannot win.

Between hands, you are free to buy as many chips as you want, but are not allowed to take any chips off the table unless you are leaving. This final rule gives opponents a chance to win back what they have lost to you.

If you bust out, you may buy back in for at least the table minimum or leave.

Once you have told the dealer how much money you are playing, the dealer may sell you chips right away or call over a chip runner to do so.

You may want to tell the dealer that you are a first-time player. This is a signal to the dealer to give a little explanation when it is your turn to act, and to the other players to extend you a bit of courtesy when you slow down the game. Everyone will figure it out in a few minutes anyway, so don't be bashful. You may even ask to sit out a few hands just to see how it all works.




How Pots are seeded

There are three ways that pots are seeded with money at the beginning of the hand.

The most familiar to the home player is the "ante", where each player tosses a small amount into the pot for the right to be dealt a hand.

The second way, often used in conjunction with an ante, is the "forced bring-in". For example, in seven-card stud, after everyone antes and is dealt the first three cards, the player with the lowest upcard may be forced to bet to get things started.

The third way, often used in games without upcards like Hold'em or Omaha, is a "forced blind bet". This is similar to the bring-in, but is always made by the person immediately after the player with the "button". The "button" is a plastic disk that moves around the table and indicates which player is acting as dealer for the hand (of course, the house dealer does the actual dealing of cards, but does not play). A second or even third blind may follow the first, usually of increasing size. Whichever seed method is used, note that this initial pot, small as it is, is the only reason to play at all.

If the game has blinds, the dealer may now ask you if you want to "post". This means, "do you want to pay extra to see a hand now, in a bad position, and then pay the blinds, or are you willing to sit and watch for a few minutes?" Answer "no, I'll wait" and watch the game until the dealer tells you it's time to begin, usually after the blinds pass you.




Splashing the Pot

In some home games, it is customary to throw chips directly into the pot.

In a public card-room, this is cause for dirty looks, a reprimand from the dealer, and possibly stopping the game to count down the pot.

When you bet, place your chips directly in front of you. The dealer will make sure that you have the right number and sweep them into the pot.






Your turn to play


Finally, it is your turn to get cards and play. Your first impression will probably be how fast the game seems to move.

If you are playing stud, several upcards may be "mucked" (folded into the discards) before you even see them; if you are playing hold'em, it may be your turn to act before you have looked at your cards. After a few hands you should settle into the rhythm and be able to keep up.

If you ever get confused, just ask the dealer what is going on.

When playing, consider the following elements of poker etiquette:




Acting in Turn

Although you may see others fold or call out of turn, don't do it yourself. It is considered rude because it gives an unfair advantage to the players before you who have yet to act. This is especially important at the showdown when only three players are left.

If players after you are acting out of turn while you decide what to do, say "Time!" to make it clear that you have not yet acted.




Handling Cards

You may find it awkward at first to peek at your own cards without exposing them to others.

Note that the other players have no formal obligation to alert you to your clumsiness, although some will.

Watch how the other players manage it and emulate them.

Leave your cards in sight at all times; holding them in your lap or passing them to your cheating friend is grounds for killing your hand.

Finally, if you intentionally show your cards to another player during the hand, both your hands may be declared dead. Your neighbour might want to see you declared dead.






Protecting Cards

In a game with "pocket cards" like Hold'em or Omaha, it is your responsibility to "protect your own cards".This confusing phrase really means "put a chip on your cards".

If your cards are just sitting out in the open, you are subject to two possible disasters:

First, the dealer may scoop them up in a blink because to leave one's cards unprotected is a signal that you are folding.

Second, another player's cards may happen to touch yours as they fold, disqualifying your hand and your interest in the pot.

Along the same lines, when you turn your cards face up at the showdown, be careful not to lose control of your cards. If one of them falls off the table or lands face-down among the discards your hand will be dead, even if that card is not used to make your hand.




Accidentally Checking

In some fast-paced games, a moment of inaction when it is your turn to act may be interpreted as a check.

Usually, a verbal declaration or rapping one's hand on the table is required, but many players are impatient and will assume your pause is a check. If you need more than a second to decide what to do, call "Time!" to stop the action. While you decide, don't tap your fingers nervously; that is a clear check signal and will be considered binding.




String Bets

A "string bet" is a bet that initially looks like a call, but then turns out to be a raise.

Once your hand has put some chips out, you may not go back to your stack to get more chips and increase the size of your bet, unless you verbally declared the size of your bet at the beginning.

If you always declare "call" or "raise" as you bet, you will be immune to this problem.

Note that a verbal declaration in turn is binding, so a verbal string bet is possible and also prohibited.

That means you cannot say "I call your $5, and raise you another $5!" Once you have said you call, that's it. The rest of the sentence is irrelevant. You can't raise.




One Chip Rule

In some card-rooms, the chip denominations and game stakes are inappropriate.

For example, a $3-$6 game might use $1 and $5 chips, instead of the more sensible $3 chip.

The one-chip rule says that using a large-denomination chip is just a call, even though the chip may be big enough to cover a raise.

If you don't have exact change, it is best to verbally state your action when throwing that large chip into the pot.

For example, suppose you are playing in a $1-$5 spread-limit game, the bet is $2 to you, and you have only $5 chips. Silently tossing a $5 chip out means you call the $2 bet.

If you want to raise to $4 or $5, you must say so before your chip hits the felt.

Whatever your action, the dealer will make any required change at the end of the betting round. Don't make change for yourself out of the pot.




Raising Forever

In a game like Hold'em, it is possible to know that you hold "the nuts" and cannot be beaten.

If this happens when all the cards are out and you get in a raising war with someone, don't stop!

Raise until one of you runs out of chips. If there is the possibility of a tie, the rest of the table may clamor for you to call, since you "obviously" both have the same hand. Ignore the rabble. You'll be surprised how many of your opponents turn out to be bona fide idiots.




The Showdown

Hands end in one of three ways:

One person bets and everyone else folds, one person bets on the final round and at least one person calls, or everybody checks on the final round.

If everybody folds to a bet, the player needs not to show the winning cards and will usually toss them to the dealer face down.

If somebody calls on the end, the person who bet or raised most recently is supposed to immediately show, or "open", their cards. They may delay doing so in a rude attempt to induce another player to show their hand in impatience, and then muck their own hand if it is not a winner. Don't do this yourself. Show your hand immediately if you get called.

If you have called a bet, wait for the player to show, then show your own hand if it's better.

If the final round is checked down, in most card-rooms everyone is supposed to open their hands immediately.

Sometimes everyone will wait for someone else to show first, resulting in a time-wasting deadlock. Break the chain and show your cards.

Most card-rooms give every player at the table the right to see all cards that called to a showdown, even if they are marked as losers. (This helps prevent cheating by team-play.)

If you are extremely curious about a certain hand, ask the dealer to show it to you. It is considered impolite to constantly ask to see losing cards.

As a beginner, you may want to show your hand all the time, since you may have overlooked a winning hand.

What you gain from one such pot will far outweigh any loss due to revealing how you played a particular losing hand.

"Cards speak" at the showdown, meaning that you need not declare the value of your hand. The dealer will look at your cards and decide if you have a winner.




Finally

As a final word of caution, it is best to hold on to your winning cards until the dealer pushes you the pot.

A dishonest player might try to steal the pot from you with a despicable trick:

When you bet and all others fold, he may conceal his hand in the hope that you will toss your cards into the muck, whereupon he will call and win the pot.




Raking in the Pot

As you win your first pot, the excitement within you will drive you beyond the realm of rational behavior, and you will immediately lunge to scoop up the precious chips with both arms.

Despite the fact that no other player had done this while you watched, despite the fact that you read here not to do it, you will do it.

Since every dealer has a witty admonition prepared for this moment, maybe it's all for the best. But next time, let the dealer push it to you, ok?




Touching Cards or Chips

Don't. Only touch your own cards and chips.

Other players' chips and cards, discards, board cards, the pot and everything else are off-limits.

Only the dealer touches the cards and pot.






Tipping

Dealers make their living from tips.

It is customary for the winner of each pot to tip the dealer 50 cents to a dollar, depending on locale and the stakes.

Sometimes you will see players tip several dollars for a big pot or an extremely unlikely suckout.

Sometimes you will see players stiff the dealer if the pot was tiny or split between two players. This is a personal issue, but imitating the other players is a good start.




Correcting Mistakes

Occasionally the dealer or a player may make a mistake, such as miscalling the winning hand at the showdown.

If you are the victim of such a mistake, call it out immediately and do not let the game proceed.

If your opponent is the victim, let your conscience be your guide; many see no ethical dilemma in remaining silent.

If you are not involved in the pot, you must judge the texture of the game to determine whether to speak up.

In general, the higher the stakes, the more likely you should keep your mouth shut.




Taking a Break


You are free to get up to stretch your legs, visit the restroom and so on.

Ask the dealer how long you may be away from your seat; 20 or 30 minutes is typical.

It is customary to leave your chips sitting on the table; part of the dealer's job is to keep them safe.

If you miss your blind(s) while away, you may have to make them up when you return, or you may be asked to sit out a few more hands until they reach you again.

If several players are gone from a table, they may all be called back to keep the game going; those who don't return in time forfeit their seats.






Color Change

If you are in the happy situation of having too many chips, you may request a "color change".

You can fill up a rack or two with your excess chips and will receive a few large denomination chips in return.

These large chips are still in play, but at least you aren't inconvenienced by a mountain of chips in front of you.

Remember the one chip rule when betting with them.




A game is full

If the game you want is full, your name will go on a list and the person running the list will call you when a seat opens up.

Depending on the card-room, you may have trouble hearing your name called and they may be quick to pass you over, so be alert.

Once a seat is available, the list person will vaguely direct you toward it, or toward a floorman who will show you where to sit.




Leaving

Leave whenever you feel like it.

You never have an obligation to stay at the table, even if you've won a fortune.

You should definitely leave if you are tired, losing more than you expect, or have other reasons to believe you are not playing your best game.

Depending on the card-room, you can redeem your chips for cash with a chip-runner or floorman or at the cashier's cage.




House Charges


Last but not least is the matter of the house take.

Somebody has to maintain the tastefully opulent furnishings and pay the electric bill.

The money taken by the house is called the "drop", since it is dropped down a slot in the table at the end of each hand.

The house will choose one of three ways to charge you to play:

Time Charge A simple "time charge" is common in higher limit games and at some small games: seats are rented by the half hour, at rates ranging from $4 to $10 or so on, depending on the stakes. This method charges all players equally.

Rake or other card-rooms will "rake" a percentage of the final pot, up to some maximum, before awarding it to the winning player. The usual rake is either 5% or 10%, capped at $3 or $4. If the pot is raked, the dealer will remove chips from the pot as it grows, setting them aside until the hand is over and they are dropped into a slot in the table. This method favors the tight player who enters few pots but wins a large fraction of them.

Button Charge A simpler method is to collect a fixed amount at the start of each hand; one player, usually the one with the dealer button, pays the entire amount of the drop. Depending on house rules, this "button charge" of $2-$4 may or may not play as a bet. If the chips do play as a bet, this method also favors the tighter players, but not nearly as much as the rake does.

Regardless of the mechanism, a card-room will try to drop about $80-$120 per hour at a $3-$6 table. The exact amount is most dependent on the local cost of doing business: Nevada is low, California and Atlantic City are high.

Since there are 7-10 players at the table, expect to pay somewhere from $7 to $14 per hour just to sit down.

Add $2-$4 per hour for dealer tips and you see why most low-limit players are long-run losers.
 

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Nice post, thank you. The others are a good review/summary & are appreciated, but this one is especially nice for me having never played in a casino.
 
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